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ein-sommernachtstraum:

Tumblr - image #1195112 by awesomeguy on Favim.com unter We Heart It.

ein-sommernachtstraum:

Tumblr - image #1195112 by awesomeguy on Favim.com unter We Heart It.

tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

(Source: lawebloca, via biologizeable)

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via biologizeable)

alex-j-hughes:

The Jewel of the Adriatic - Dubrovnik, Croatia

alex-j-hughes:

The Jewel of the Adriatic - Dubrovnik, Croatia

(via allthingscroatia)

robertvaladez:

Luis Barragán,  (born March 9, 1902Guadalajara, Mex.—died Nov. 22, 1988Mexico City), Mexican engineer and architect whose serene and evocative houses, gardens, plazas, and fountains won him the Pritzker Prize in 1980.

Barragán, who was born into a wealthy family, grew up on a ranch near Guadalajara, Mex. He attended the Escuela Libre de Ingenieros (Free School of Engineers) there, taking a degree in civil engineering in 1923 and continuing his studies in architecture. In 1924 he began to travel, mostly in SpainFrance, Italy, and Greece. During this period of extensive travel, he first came across the published works of the German-born French landscape architect and illustrator Ferdinand Bac. When Barragán returned to Guadalajara, he began to work with his brother Juan José and completed his first project in 1927. Four years later he again went to Europe, where he met Bac and Le Corbusier, both of whom were to have a profound influence on his work.

On his return to Guadalajara, Barragán began to conceive new methods by which he could create what he called an “emotional architecture,” one that would encourage meditation and quietude. In 1935 he moved to Mexico City, where he began to apply the principles of Le Corbusier and the International school. With the evolution of his own ideas, his works began to take on the elements that characterize his mature period—natural siting, simple surfaces (slabs of concrete, immense walls of stucco), water features, the use of colour, and so on. From roughly 1943 to 1952 he developed El Pedregal (“The Lava”) as a subdivision of Mexico City, taking great care to incorporate intact its volcanic outcroppings and other natural formations.

Barragán’s output was not large. The majority of the structures he built are in Guadalajara and Mexico City. Among his notable works are the house he created around existing buildings at 20–22 Calle Ramírez in the Tacubaya district of Mexico City, where he lived beginning in the 1940s; numbers 10 and 12 Avenida de las Fuentes, among the first houses to be built in El Pedregal, and the Prieto López House there; the San Cristóbal Stables/Egerstrom House; the Gálvez House; and the Gilardi House. The Barragan Foundation (1996) is located near Basel, Switz.

(via fuckyeahmexico)

tootricky:

love bird has a wash (source)

(via biologizeable)

When I’m hurt, I shut down. I turn into a total sarcastic bitch. I shut off my emotions, and act indifferent towards everything even though it might be killing me inside.
– And I’m sorry (via these-fading-scars)

(via ein-sommernachtstraum)

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 

SOURCE

(via biologizeable)

breakinq:

following back heaps♡

breakinq:

following back heaps♡

(via gatos-voladoress)

¡2 000 publicaciones!

miw, siempre tumblereando cosas favs y desconocidas.

¡2 000 publicaciones!

miw, siempre tumblereando cosas favs y desconocidas.

(Source: nigel-bd, via thesundownshift)

ein-sommernachtstraum:

Tumblr - image #1195112 by awesomeguy on Favim.com unter We Heart It.

ein-sommernachtstraum:

Tumblr - image #1195112 by awesomeguy on Favim.com unter We Heart It.

tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

tastefullyoffensive:

"Get down, Mr. President!" [video]

(Source: lawebloca, via biologizeable)

skunkbear:

The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.

Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:

Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.

First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:

 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.

She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)

You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here.

(via biologizeable)

alex-j-hughes:

The Jewel of the Adriatic - Dubrovnik, Croatia

alex-j-hughes:

The Jewel of the Adriatic - Dubrovnik, Croatia

(via allthingscroatia)

robertvaladez:

Luis Barragán,  (born March 9, 1902Guadalajara, Mex.—died Nov. 22, 1988Mexico City), Mexican engineer and architect whose serene and evocative houses, gardens, plazas, and fountains won him the Pritzker Prize in 1980.

Barragán, who was born into a wealthy family, grew up on a ranch near Guadalajara, Mex. He attended the Escuela Libre de Ingenieros (Free School of Engineers) there, taking a degree in civil engineering in 1923 and continuing his studies in architecture. In 1924 he began to travel, mostly in SpainFrance, Italy, and Greece. During this period of extensive travel, he first came across the published works of the German-born French landscape architect and illustrator Ferdinand Bac. When Barragán returned to Guadalajara, he began to work with his brother Juan José and completed his first project in 1927. Four years later he again went to Europe, where he met Bac and Le Corbusier, both of whom were to have a profound influence on his work.

On his return to Guadalajara, Barragán began to conceive new methods by which he could create what he called an “emotional architecture,” one that would encourage meditation and quietude. In 1935 he moved to Mexico City, where he began to apply the principles of Le Corbusier and the International school. With the evolution of his own ideas, his works began to take on the elements that characterize his mature period—natural siting, simple surfaces (slabs of concrete, immense walls of stucco), water features, the use of colour, and so on. From roughly 1943 to 1952 he developed El Pedregal (“The Lava”) as a subdivision of Mexico City, taking great care to incorporate intact its volcanic outcroppings and other natural formations.

Barragán’s output was not large. The majority of the structures he built are in Guadalajara and Mexico City. Among his notable works are the house he created around existing buildings at 20–22 Calle Ramírez in the Tacubaya district of Mexico City, where he lived beginning in the 1940s; numbers 10 and 12 Avenida de las Fuentes, among the first houses to be built in El Pedregal, and the Prieto López House there; the San Cristóbal Stables/Egerstrom House; the Gálvez House; and the Gilardi House. The Barragan Foundation (1996) is located near Basel, Switz.

(via fuckyeahmexico)

kingdomy:

Karen Glaser - Dark Sharks

(via biologizeable)

tootricky:

love bird has a wash (source)

(via biologizeable)

When I’m hurt, I shut down. I turn into a total sarcastic bitch. I shut off my emotions, and act indifferent towards everything even though it might be killing me inside.
– And I’m sorry (via these-fading-scars)

(via ein-sommernachtstraum)

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 

SOURCE

(via biologizeable)

breakinq:

following back heaps♡

breakinq:

following back heaps♡

(via gatos-voladoress)

¡2 000 publicaciones!

miw, siempre tumblereando cosas favs y desconocidas.

¡2 000 publicaciones!

miw, siempre tumblereando cosas favs y desconocidas.

"When I’m hurt, I shut down. I turn into a total sarcastic bitch. I shut off my emotions, and act indifferent towards everything even though it might be killing me inside."

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Me gusta imaginar que piensa la gente mientras viajo en el metro.

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